Top NFT-Based Trading Card Games (TCGs)

NFT-based games integrate traditional gaming concepts with blockchain technology, non-fungible tokens (NFTs), and other decentralized financial elements. 

Gamers are loving GameFi (the intersection of gaming and NFTs, and even DeFi) for three main reasons: 

  1. True ownership: While in conventional digital games, players can buy in-game assets, those assets don’t actually belong to them. On the other hand, NFT-based games give players complete control over their assets– in-game assets like cards, lands, avatars, or swords are NFTs.
  2. Verifiable rarity and uniqueness: Non-fungibility makes it possible for creators to make 100% unique tokens, as well as programming different rarity levels for the assets. Naturally, some items in games will be scarcer or more useful than others, and their value should reflect that. Since everything happens on the blockchain, it’s easy to verify the scarcity, uniqueness, and authenticity of each asset.
  • Opportunity to earn income while playing: These games implement play-to-earn mechanisms. By participating in games, players can earn cryptocurrencies and in-game items that have real-world value. Many games have their own secondary markets for trading.

NFT-Based trading card games are getting so much attention because they’re a perfect mesh for most any game genre, from role-playing games to fighting games. One of the most popular gaming categories is card trading. 

For many people, training card games, or TCGs, revive childhood memories of collectible card games while at the same time offering a new way of generating revenue.

In play-to-earn NFT-based card trading games, each card is a non-fungible token (NFT), usually in ERC-721 standards. They enable the play-to-earn mechanism using common elements found in GameFi, such as an in-game currency and a marketplace. 

Here are the top NFT-based trading card games. 

Gods Unchained

Gods Unchained is the most popular trading card game in the blockchain universe. It runs on Ethereum and Immutable X. 

Gods Unchained is a free-to-play fantasy-themed turn-based, tactical card game; players must build their decks based on a strategy. 

By playing the game, you can earn common core cards. Those cards can’t be traded on the marketplace; at this point, they are not minted on the blockchain. It’s possible to increase the value of these common cards, by earning “flux”, a resource gained by winning the ranked games.

Gods Unchained has a process called The Forge, in which players who have earned enough flux can merge two identical core cards into one by spending flux. This process creates higher-quality cards, and since the forged cards are minted on the blockchain, they can be sold on the blockchain, sometimes for a hefty profit. 

Splinterlands

Splinterlands game runs on the Hive blockchain. 

You can test the game for free, but to start playing, you need to buy a starter set for $10.You can get new cards by buying packs from the shop or individual items from other players in the marketplace. You can also sell your assets on this marketplace. 

One of the highlights of Splinterlands is its cross-compatibility with multiple blockchains, enabling users to trade their cards on several marketplaces. 

In addition to selling your cards, you can earn in Splinterlands by getting its in-game currency DEC (Dark Energy Crystals). There are a couple of ways to acquire DEC in the game. First, by winning ranked battles, and second by destroying the cards you don’t use anymore. You can use DEC to buy assets from the game’s shop.

Another way to earn on Splinterlands is renting your cards via peakmonsters.

Sorare

Sorare is a fantasy football game built on the Ethereum blockchain. 

You can collect player cards and build teams, and as with real-world trading card games, the real value comes from the most valuable player cards. Depending on the rarity of the card, it can get quite expensive.

The Sorare play-to-earn mechanism enables users to participate in tournaments, where users can earn points and rewards based on their team’s performance.

Dark Country Game

Dark Country is a trading card game on the WAX blockchain with gothic-themed characters like zombies, ghosts, and haunted Indians.

In addition to cards, players can own heroes, items, and lands as NFT assets. Players can stake Dark Country assets on rplanet.io and collect cards on collect.social to gain the platform’s Racoon tokens. 

Dark Country has a weekly forging activity similar to Gods Unchained’s The Forge called Heroes Reforge and Staking. Players need to burn four heroes of the same type in order to receive a new hero with better quality. They can then stake this improved asset to earn rewards.

Dark Country has recently introduced land assets compatible with WAX and Flow blockchains. 

With lands, several new revenue generation options will be possible soon, such as land leasing and staking the platform’s in-game currency Shadow Dime (SDM) on lands.

Final Thoughts: Emerging Exciting New TCG Projects

While some may argue that the game mechanics of most NFT-based games are primitive and “not quite there yet,” TCGs marry the simplicity of a trading card game with the blockchain very well. 

A few more exciting TCG projects to keep an eye on include:

  1. Skyweaver, a free-to-play Ethereum-based game in beta mode. Players have three grades of cards: base, silver, and gold. Base cards can’t be traded, but silver and gold cards can be. You earn silver cards via ranked rewards and conquest, and gold cards via conquest.
  2. Parallel,  a science-fiction-themed card game also based on the Ethereum blockchain. The team built its own NFT drop system. The project is currently raising funds by selling drops, which contain cards. These cards will have utilities once the game development is complete.
  3. Metropolis Origins, is a cyberpunk-themed card game by QXR Studios running on the WAX blockchain. It’s a sequel to game designer Graeme Devine’s adventure game Metropolis. The game released a founder NFT pack that enables owners to play the game in beta mode. 

The evolution of blockchain card games will be one to watch, as more implementations of conventional card games on the blockchain continue to emerge.  With NFTs’ programmable nature, we can expect to see the evolution of more dynamic, and potentially lucrative and competitive, playing card games in the near future. 

NFT Copyright: What Artists and Collectors Should Know

NFT art is soaring in popularity due to the blockchain’s ability to offer a multitude of features that appeal to both creators and collectors. 

Artists continue earning royalties for the same artwork from the sales in the secondary market, which isn’t possible in the traditional art scene. 

Collectors enjoy advantages that weren’t possible before blockchain technology, such as an undisputable artwork’s transaction history and provenance, scarcity, and liquidity. 

However, the NFT ownership concept is more complicated than meets the eye, and it often trips up many.

But what do I actually own? 

What if someone just screenshots your art? 

Can I sue someone if they print my NFT on a shirt?

The answer to all of these questions is a nebulous “it depends.”

When someone buys an art NFT, they don’t purchase the artwork itself but the token that represents it. 

Owning the token isn’t necessarily the same thing as owning the copyrights of the underlying asset, unless it was specified in the underlying contract. 

The following guide explores what NFT copyright is, and what both creators and collectors should know about their NFTs. 

Copyrights and intellectual property rights

Copyright is a bundle of rights that specify what’s ok and what isn’t, regarding things like reproducing and distributing copies of the work, preparing derivatives based on the original work, displaying the work in public, and performing the work publicly, as regulated by 17 U.S. Code § 106.

Purchasing an NFT doesn’t transfer these rights to the buyer automatically. Unless an external agreement (17 U.S. Code § 204) is made between the artist and the purchaser,  the artist who created the original artwork remains the copyright holder.

The artist can transfer the copyright, grant a license for specific purposes, or limit the NFT’s use in some way. Agreements used for transferring rights must be coded in the smart contracts or expressed in written terms elsewhere.

Intellectual property (IP) is a broader concept that can refer to any product of the human intellect that the law protects from unauthorized use by others. Patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets all fall into the realm of IP.

Again, the only way an NFT buyer can retain IP rights is through an explicit agreement signed by the creator of the original artwork.

Standard license agreements for NFT ownership confer the rights to use, copy, display, resale, and gift NFTs. Granting a license of copyright and IP to the buyer through smart contracts or external agreements is also common. Some NFT projects permit commercial use, like CryptoKitties. 

CryptoKitty owners can use them to commercialize their own merchandise, given that they don’t earn more than $100K per year. Another well-known NFT project, Bored Ape Yacht Club, has generous IP terms similar to CryptoKitties. For example, owners are allowed to create characters around their apes or print them on their personal belongings.

Copyright Terms of NFT Marketplaces 

Although there’ll always be exceptions, we can say that in open marketplaces like Opensea and Rarible, artists license the NFTs to the buyer and not to the marketplace.

In marketplaces where only exclusive NFT collections are sold, the marketplace usually owns the NFTs and the related IP rights, like in the case of NBA Top Shot.

Curated marketplaces like Superrare, MakersPlace, and Nifty Gateway, artists are expected to grant licenses for display, distribution, and derivative rights, for promotional activities. Some marketplaces require artists not to mint multiple NFTs for the same artwork.

On Rarible and MakersPlace, artists can apply a custom license to their NFTs, in addition to platforms’ own standard agreements.

When an NFT is resold, the general practice is that any resale activity terminates the former owner’s rights and the current owner of that NFT becomes the new license holder.

NFT Copyright: What You Should Know as a Collector 

As a rule of thumb, NFT owners generally only have the copyrights to resale and gift their NFTs. Please don’t assume you can create derivatives of the underlying artworks and sell them for commercial purposes by default. 

Some projects may be cool with it, others may not. 

Some projects may give holders every possible right under the sun with their NFT, whereas others insist on keeping the project’s branding, and every NFT, held close. 

Always research the related platform’s license terms and conditions yourself if your intentions are beyond reselling the artwork in the secondary market. Otherwise, copyright infringement issues may arise.

It would help if you also bought only on platforms you trust. Always double-check if the artist verifies the related artwork as theirs. In May 2021, artist Xcopy, a famous figure in the crypto art community, tweeted about a fraud regarding his art on a new platform called Hen. 

This isn’t a rare event in the NFT world; always check if you’re buying an original work of art.

NFT Copyright: What you Should Know as an Artist

Artists should only mint their own creations. If the work is done in collaboration with others, their authorization is necessary.

It seems obvious, but in the Wild West vibe of early NFT marketplaces, it seems that you can get away with minting shoddy reproductions of other works. 

Remember how the blockchain tracks every transaction ever? While NFT copyright law is in its wobbly baby deer leg phases now, it’s not difficult to algorithmically track financial and copyright crimes. 

In the NFT world, many frauds take place. If you happen to discover your art is being sold as an NFT by someone else without your consent, you can claim copyright infringement against the sellers.

As stated above, unless you transfer the copyrights to buyers with an external agreement, you hold the copyrights of your work. However, if you did the NFT artwork initially under an employment contract, it might be regarded as work for hire, according to 17 U.S. Code § 101. In this case, the employer might hold the copyrights.

As a precaution against people with bad intentions, you can release your artwork as an NFT before sharing it with someone else.

Finally, like collectors, artists should also be wary of the platform they sell their art and terms and conditions regarding copyrights.  

Final Thoughts: Expect NFT Copyright Law to Evolve

Both collectors and artists should be aware that NFT technology is very new and many issues regarding IP rights are not completely clear. 

Understanding the underlying technology is necessary for both parties, along with the legal aspects. In case of conflicts, consulting lawyers for legal advice is inevitable.

What is NFT Metadata & How Does It Work?

The word “meta” is all the rage lately since the Facebook name re-brand, but let’s get our crypto fundamentals in order before everything is referred to as metadata. 

A Non-Fungible Token (NFT) is a token that represents a single specific digital asset, whether that be a .JPEG file, .GIF, .MP4, or whatever else. That file itself can’t be hosted on the Ethereum blockchain, so it’s hosted off-chain. NFT metadata specifies what that data is and includes things like the visual or auditory asset and other information like transactional history. 

NFT metadata is essentially a workaround to avoid the technical and financial catastrophe (or, impossibility, rather) of hosting large files natively on-chain on Ethereum or other blockchain environments. 

For example, if you wanted to run a full Ethereum node, you’d have to download the full Ethereum blockchain of about 1,050 GB (the archival nodes, or the entirety of the Ethereum blockchain since it launched, is about 9,000 GB). 

That’s to run the entire Ethereum network– yes, all ETH-related matters, DeFi, NFTs, and dApps make up just under 1,100 GB. 

In comparison, a 1080 full-feature length movie is about 2 to 4 GB on its own, and most high-quality images can be around 2 to 20 MB. There simply isn’t a way to store these files on the Ethereum blockchain because it would make running the network prohibitively storage and data-consuming.

How expensive are we talking? Gemini estimates that simply storing 1 GB of data on the Ethereum blockchain costs about 17,500 ETH (or $75.75 million as of November 2021). The costs to simply just store a blockbuster movie like James Cameron’s Avatar on the Ethereum blockchain would be more than the costs of making the $237 million film. 

That’s where NFT metadata comes in. It’s a careful balance of utilizing the blockchain without burdening it with the data. 

But, NFT metadata existing off-chain creates a few other issues, which we’ll get into below. 

Let’s Get Technical: NFT Metadata

We’ll use the classic Ethereum ERC-721 token standard for the following NFT discussion.

Each ERC-721 contains a “metadata” string in its definition, which defines what the non-fungible token actually is. For example, this metadata could point to a specific .JPEG, which makes all the difference; although a CryptoPunk .JPEG and a DeadFellaz .JPEG are of comparable file size, they’re worth significantly different amounts. 

The crux of the matter that trips people up about NFT metadata is where exactly files are stored off-chain– is it a Google Drive of some sorts? Is it some Amazon Web Services file storage? Who runs the show of hosting NFT metadata online?

Each NFT references the visual or auditory (image, audio, etc) file that exists online somewhere. It makes a request for the content at a specific location, which returns the content for you to see or hear. NFTs usually point to an IPFS (InterPlanetary File System) hash or an HTTP URL somewhere on the Internet. 

This “somewhere” is generally hosted by the website that hosts the NFT. ERC-721s specify metadata in a standardized JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) format, that looks something like this

The information is stored as a URI (Universal Resource Identifier) inside the Ethereum contract, rather than a JSON; storing a JSON would be prohibitively expensive and resource-demanding. The URI string, however, points to a location where the user can find the token’s JSON description. 

The token’s metadata exists as a permanent, unalterable record on the blockchain, and this record describes what the token represents (its URI string to JSON), the token’s ownership and transaction history. The JSON file contains the image’s name, description, URL of where it’s hosted, and sometimes more granular information like the project’s total supply, type of encryption, and a unique signature. 

Limitations of NFTs 

This JSON metadata typically only identifies the asset, and doesn’t provide much in-depth information beyond the bare essentials. 

The data isn’t very searchable or readable by other smart contracts, which is a kink and limitation of the Ethereum network that multiple projects are attempting to address. 

The data is created by the token minters, who actually own the NFT contract. However, users can’t update the data, for better or for worse, which can be problematic for a few reasons.

For one, as we’ve seen in the evolving Internet ecosystem, links can break. Since the NFT metadata links you to somewhere else to view the art, if that link dies, you’ll essentially be pointing to a very expensive 404 error page. The JSON data can’t be updated by users, and neither can the links be fixed. 

The crux of the issue is that if the data were able to be updated, the inherent value of the NFT could be compromised. For example, let’s say a malicious third-party found an exploit to change all the Bored Ape Yacht Club image metadata with pictures of real-world apes found on Google; the market would respond, and likely negatively.

Hosting Mechanisms also have their fair share of limitations:

  1. HTTP server owners could theoretically change the content of a specific server to whatever they like.
  2. IPFS is designed for decentralized hosting, but is still operated by centralized entities like NFT marketplaces that serve the role of IPFS nodes that keep the gateway live. 

Final Thoughts: What is NFT Metadata Exactly?

As we’ve learned, NFT metadata is the second of the two key pieces to the NFT value proposition. 

The first is that NFTs have a unique ID that distinguishes each token as unique from every other token. The ERC-721 tokenization standard utilizes Ethereum smart contracts to record transfers and changes of ownership of each particular NFT, which is a fairly computation-heavy endeavor. This is why gas fees are generally much higher for trading or minting NFTs compared to simply sending ETH on the network. 

NFT metadata is baked into the second fundamental feature that makes NFTs tick. NFTs can link to data external to their smart contract, essentially allowing the network to reference data that exists off-chain. This keeps the computational costs of running NFTs on a network like Ethereum lower than they would be. 

The Non-Fungible Token that defines the provenance of an asset lives on the blockchain, whereas the asset itself typically lives off-chain. There are few exceptions; for example, OnChain Monkeys is a collection created entirely on chain with a single transaction.  There is no file storage solution needed since the entire collection is hosted on-chain. 

Are NFTs Truly Decentralized Art?

There are quite a bit of misunderstandings around NFTs. Many people think NFTs are minted on the Ethereum blockchain through a platform like Rarible and — voila! — the art is non-fungible and lives forever in a decentralized manner on the blockchain. But that’s not entirely the case. NFTs, or “non-fungible tokens” are really only non-fungible to the extent that it refers to the actual token, not the underlying artwork or rare asset itself. As such, the token and the “asset” it represents are two completely different things.

Huh?

Okay, let’s rewind a bit here. Although NFTs are often associated with digital art or GIFs these days, the reality is that they are better understood as a class of assets that are non-fungible. The $10 bill you used to pay for the coffee this morning? Fungible. The fingerprint you left on the bill when paying? Non-fungible. But is your fingerprint an asset? Debatable, depending on how much fingerprints go for on the black market these days (a joke, relax). But a key thing to remember is that non-fungible does not classify an object as rare, nor does it ensure that it is ‘rare’ or even decentralized.

This concept was probably best illustrated with a recent “rug pull” stunt conducted by one clever sculptor on the OpenSea platform. The artist exchanged the original JPEG images that the collectors thought they were purchasing with random pictures of rugs after the sale concluded. The intent of the stunt was to highlight the inherent problem of the current NFT infrastructure — which is mostly built on the Ethereum blockchain. By purchasing the NFT, the buyer would simply own the token to authenticate the JPEG listed on OpenSea, which at the time of purchase was a dope piece of art. But because the underlying digital asset itself is not decentralized, and might be stored on a central server somewhere such as on AWS or GCS, the buyer has no control in terms of what the NFT itself represents.

In other words, the non-fungibility is currently applied to the token representing the transaction of the purchase — not necessarily the owner of the physical (or digital) piece of art.

This is a common problem in the NFT sphere, as buyers often misunderstand the underlying infrastructure of the art they are buying, which can be problematic when there isn’t a physical equivalent of the purchase, ie: a digital GIF.

With most NFT marketplaces being built on Ethereum, another key problem is raised. The Ethereum network is often congested by other sectors such as DeFi, which eat up the majority of the bandwidth and exponentially raises the prices for minting and transacting NFTs. When compounded with the previously outlined problem, it is easy to see why the NFT art space is not the perfect picture it is painted to be after all.

This is where a platform like Pastel can paint a brighter future. Unlike Rarible or OpenSea, Pastel has built its own layer 1 blockchain to compete with Ethereum based platforms. This brings with it an innate advantage because the underlying architecture is designed to be perfectly outfitted and purpose-built for the sole use case for digital art and other rare digital assets, rather than being a do-it-all blockchain like Ethereum. With fewer projects demanding bandwidth, minting and trading NFTs on Pastel is significantly lighter on your (digital) wallet as well due to very low gas costs

In regards to the main problem of preventing “rug pulls”, Pastel ensures that the art (or other NFT) itself is uploaded, verified, and registered on the Pastel blockchain — rather than just the token it is minted with. Through a series of smart tickets living on the Pastel ledger, artists can store their masterpieces in a distributed fashion across a variety of Supernodes as opposed to just ensuring the token is non-fungible. This sophisticated storage layer, leveraging the RaptorQ fountain code algorithm, ensures that each asset is broken up and stored in a series of redundant, fungible chunks. These sets of chunks ar ethen distributed across the network using the Kademlia DHT algorithm. So what does this really mean? In short, even if over 90% of hosted instances suddenly go down, the remaining information can be reconstructed quickly and there is no possibility of the artwork disappearing.

So the next time you purchase an NFT, make sure you understand how and where your rare digital asset is stored — so that you won’t have the rug pulled out from underneath you.

Learn more about Pastel Network, and join us below!

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Beyond JPEGs and GIFs: What to Expect of Future NFT Use Cases

With so much recent activity in the NFT art space, it may seem tricky to separate the concept of NFTs from the lucrative flipping of JPEGs and GIFs. 

It shouldn’t be a surprise that the topic of NFTs often brings up a few consistent data points: 

An NFT is simply just a token on a blockchain that identifies something unique; this “something” can be anything from a house to the legal rights of an idea. 

The following article explores how NFTs stand to revolutionize a few industries ripe for renovation. 

Why NFTs?

NFTs are unique digital tokens in that they can carry data stored in an immutable blockchain ledger; this data specifies a .JPEG, MP4, or .TXT of a contract. 

Every time a specific NFT token goes through a transaction, the blockchain adds a new block to the blockchain with the new owner’s information. This chain of transactions allows one to trace the ownership of digital assets throughout the entirety of its history. 

Keep the following features of NFTs in mind before we go through the top future NFT use cases:

Indivisible: The “non-fungibility” of NFTs means that they cannot be broken down into sub-assets– you technically can’t cut a CryptoPunk into a dozen pieces. However, there can be fractional ownership of a single NFT; multiple people can share a percentage of the NFT through other mechanisms. 

Verifiable: The blockchain gives anyone the ability to verify the authenticity of a digital asset, no matter how many times it has changed hands. 

Indestructible: Since an NFT exists solely on the blockchain, it cannot be destroyed. For example, let’s say you buy a Cool Cat NFT for the ETH equivalent of $15,000. You decide to buy a digital frame for $150 and put it on your wall. If a burglar breaks in and steals your frame, you only lose the frame; the NFT would still exist on the blockchain. 

#1: Real Estate

Real estate is an industry entrenched in traditional, inefficient processes. The actual ownership of physical real estate alone is a sub-sector of the industry exhausted by outdated practices. For example, in order to prove you own a property, you’d use a title deed document to prove so. If it’s misplaced, or its record cannot be found online, you could find yourself riled in legal disputes and complexities. 

All of this can be avoided by using NFTs. Since these tokens digitally represent assets, such as land, buildings, or even rooms, tracking the ownership and authenticity of a tokenized property would be possible from anywhere in the world. 

One such startup, Propy, is already utilizing NFTs for real-estate transactions. 

It’s worth noting that NFTs are also being used to represent virtual land ownership, as seen on projects like Decentraland

Decentraland

#2: Ticketing 

If you’ve ever bought a ticket to see a concert or sporting event online, you’d get a quick glance at one of the most visible ticket industry problems– the “convenience” fee that sometimes amounts to 20% to 30% of the transaction.

Even worse, the moment in-demand tickets go for sale online, the site is flooded by scalpers and bots trying to buy as many tickets as they can to flip them for higher prices in secondary markets. 

And in these secondary markets, one out of ten people is likely to get scammed; they frustratingly find out at the event gates– potentially hours of travel, waiting in lines, preparation, and excitement only to find out you got ripped off. 

NFTs solve most of these problems.

For one, NFTs play nice with other blockchain-based solutions, which tend to disintermediate the middle-man ticketing companies charging a third of the ticket price in convenience fees. 

Second, NFTs offer immediate authenticity verification and secure owner transfers. This is an incredibly valuable feature on secondary markets– NFTs make trust the default in a trustless environment. 

#3. Domain Name Ownership

Blockchain-based domains, usually represented by NFTs, play a very important role in domain ownership. 

For starters, NFT domains are owned by you, not rented. No one actually owns a domain, which is a tricky concept– you pay to register your domain with a domain name registrar, but not even registrars own the domain. These registrars are delegated the management of top-level domains like “.com” or “.uk” by ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers). 

Traditional domain name ownership is a rabbithole, but in a nutshell, the whole system only works because everyone in it agrees that it should. 

Modern domains can be incredibly valuable– the most expensive sale yet was $872 million for Cars.com.  

The problem NFTs solve is that domain name ownership is centralized and vulnerable to centralization. If someone (i.e. the government) wants a specific domain shut down, it can probably get it done with limited complications. 

Alternatively, NFT-based domain owners pay a one-time registration fee (compared to an annual renewal cost) and own the domain. 

The domain is stored in a wallet just like a cryptocurrency coin or token, and no one can take it from you unless your wallet is hacked. 

In practice, your NFT-based domain points to content stored on a decentralized storage network. 

NFT Domains can be purchased through retailers like UnstoppableDomains or on marketplaces like OpenSea.

#4: Intellectual Property and Patents

Some of the most valuable assets in the world don’t actually exist in the real world, which makes proving or splitting ownership among multiple parties a nebulous task. 

Intellectual property and patents are very illiquid, and disputes around ownership or sale can require mountains of paperwork and hundreds of billable legal hours. 

Not only can NFTs be used to represent ideas on the blockchain, they can also seamlessly fractionalize this ownership among multiple parties. 

The application of NFTs to IPs and patents is still in its nascent stages, but there are a few notable projects making rapid progress, and NFT licensing framework is setting the stage for future innovations. 

The most notable progress is by IBM’s collaboration with an IP ecosystem platform called IPwe; the organizations are attempting to tokenize patents so patent owners can enable their trading on safe and accessible marketplaces. 

Final Thoughts

While the above NFT applications are some of the hottest today, this list is by no means exhaustive. If this article is outdated by the time you read it– good, that means we were right. 

Any industry that needs verifiable authenticity will also benefit from the immediacy, finality, and transportability of NFTs. 

When updating this article in the future, you’ll see a heap of new use cases emerging from public, private, and government sectors, and hopefully with progressive policies regarding the NFT space. 

For now, we anticipate the NFT conversation will continue to be dominated by the most aesthetically consuming and appealing applications of NFTs, but we expect the popular “XYZ Art NFT sells for $50 Million” headlines of today to slowly start morphing to “$114 Million Bel Air Mansion Sells as NFT” or “Rare Metallica Back-Stage Pass Sells for $10M” to become commonplace.